Summary #400

Scientists find genetic reason why store-bought tomatoes taste so bland

blogs.discovermagazine.com
  • The study indicates that the tomatoes that most people buy in stores are tasteless because they lack a gene that transmits the flavor and color of tomatoes: the TomLoxC gene.
  • The authors of the research came to this conclusion after analyzing the genetic information of more than 700 species of wild and domestic tomatoes.
  • The analysis showed that tomatoes grown on domestic farms lacked more than 5,000 genes, including those for protection against diseases and the gene for flavor and color.
  • The lack of these genes is not due to genetic manipulations but to the selection of species that over time only took into account the search for size, profitable production, and shelf life of the tomato.
  • The results of this research will allow incorporating genes that contribute to improving the flavor and protection of tomatoes grown against disease-producing agents.

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