Summary #356

People’s sense of control over their actions is reduced at a fundamental level when they’re angry or afraid

digest.bps.org.uk
  • A group of researchers measured the “intentional binding” of several participants and observed that when they were angry or afraid they tended to lose control of their actions.
  • The “intentional binding” is a test in which the participants press the button of a clock that rotates permanently and they say what time the clock indicated when they pushed the button.
  • According to the evidence, the people who control their actions tend to push the button on the clock later than those who cannot control their actions.
  • The main limitation of this study was that the researchers did not measure the “intentional binding” when the participants were happy.
  • Based on ethical and moral aspects, the reduction of the control of actions caused by anger or fear cannot be taken as an excuse to defend criminals, the study suggests.

Categories

  • Science Science (67) Solution to century-old math problem could predict transmission of infectious diseases
  • Psychology Psychology (72) Me, myself, bye: regional alterations in glutamate and the experience of ego dissolution with psilocybin
  • Cosmos Cosmos (30) Huge explosion, second only to the Big Bang, discovered 390 million light years from Earth
  • History History (17) World's oldest string of yarn shows Neanderthals were smarter than we thought
  • Society Society (79) At 19, am I too young for cannabis? Choosing the ‘right’ minimum legal age for legalized non-medical cannabis
  • Medicine Medicine (70) Anesthesia's effect on consciousness solved, settling century-old scientific debate
  • Technology Technology (77) A new scheme for satellite-based quantum-secure time transfer
  • Nature Nature (54) New Studies Find Birds Are Eating Hundreds of Plastic Bits Daily

Newsletter

Newsletter

Fame 🙌

Bullets.tech - Articles for science lovers shortened to five bullet points. | Product Hunt Embed

We were featured on Hacker News, O'REILLY® Ideas, and Boing Boing.